Criticism from inside the EU

Harsh criticisms over this non-optimal currency zone is now emerging from within the EU.

Here, president of the Czech Republic talks about the conflict that many Eastern European countries faced after the fall of communism: the need for closer integration with the west, in this case, western Europe, while shying away from the statist aspirations spear-headed by France and Germany that only reminded them days of Soviet rule.

People like me understood very early that the idea of a European single currency is a dangerous project which will either bring big problems or lead to the undemocratic centralization of Europe. My position was clear: With all my reservations, we had to apply for EU membership, but at the same time we had to fight against projects such as the euro.

His criticism separated the idea of European cooperation, from the euro project itself, which for all intents and purposes, has failed.  Klaus the economist says:

The huge amount of money that Greece will receive can be divided by the number of the euro-zone inhabitants, and each person can calculate his or her own “contribution.” However, the “opportunity” costs arising from the loss of a potentially higher growth rate, which is much more difficult for a non-economist to imagine, will be far more painful. I do not doubt that for political reasons this price will be paid and that the euro-zone inhabitants will never find out just how much the euro truly cost them.

Unsurprisingly, as the leader of a country that’s suffered dearly in the hands of communism, Klaus the politician minces no words in his critique of opaque bureaucracy centered in Brussels.

The recent dealings in EU headquarters in Brussels—literally behind closed doors—about the aid package for Greece demonstrated that there is no democracy there. The German-French tandem made the decision on behalf of the rest of the euro-zone countries, and I am afraid this will continue.

Not everyone heeds to this view, of course.  As late as March, many eastern and central European states still aspire to join the euro party, many already pegging their own small currencies to the euro.

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